(800) 821-3520 - Customer Support

    subscribe

    Connect With Us

    Get the latest news from Austin Hardware

    Contact Us

    Rob Dell'Elmo

    Recent Posts

    Learn more About Using Austin Hardware's Complete Line of Super Heavy Duty Drawer Slides.

    Posted by Rob Dell'Elmo on Feb 23, 2022 9:00:00 AM

     

    Read More

    Austin Hardware®, Football Pool Sponsors Come Up Big for Charity This Season.

    Posted by Rob Dell'Elmo on Feb 10, 2022 9:28:45 AM
    Read More

    New Product Release! Third Generation LifeDefender™ Updates are Designed With End-User's Needs In Mind.

    Posted by Rob Dell'Elmo on Dec 13, 2021 10:00:00 AM


    EMTs, paramedic’s and other critical care workers have an incredible responsibility and they’re often doing it while racing to the hospital and against the clock. They don’t have time to think about their own safety while caring for a patient. LifeDefender Cabinet Security Frames were developed with these dedicated workers and their patients in mind. The 3rd generation of this revolutionary product is the fruit of the feedback from ambulance manufacturers and their customers. 
     

    HubSpot Video

    Improved features in the 3rd generation updates include:

    - An optional key locking feature is now available pre-installed for both the fixed and restocker (a.k.a. "speed-load") frames. 

    - Tag brackets, an optional inventory control feature that can be pre-installed onto the frame, have been improved with more mounting options and soft, over-molded covers on exposed areas.  

    - The slider handles have been redesigned smaller while maintaining the same operation and latching function. The smaller size allows the slider to open further, providing an extra inch of access space when the slider is open. 

    - Hinges are now anodized aluminum to improve the appearance against the frame as well as cosmetic durability.
      
    - To more easily adjust a cabinet's latch clearance and door position, the hinge shims have been improved with all hole locations now slotted, allowing the shims to be added or removed between the hinge and cabinet without removing the hinge screws.  

    - Frames are now available with an optional pre-installed protective film on the outer frame. The film can remain on the frame without affecting the frame function.  

    - Fixed-frame LifeDefender units now include a new tether system to provide an extra connection between the cabinet and frame, which is especially helpful in wooden cabinets.  

    - Unframed LifeDefender doors (CW series) are now available with pre-engineered motion control options (gas springs or dampers) to move and hold the door in its open position. 

    Read More

    Topics: ambulances, Essential EMT, LifeDefender™

    Using Austin Hardware's High-Quality, Heavy-Duty ADS 7650 and AH 7600 Series Drawer Slides in Different Applications.

    Posted by Rob Dell'Elmo on Nov 12, 2021 10:00:00 AM

    The ADS 7650 and AH 7600 series side mount drawer slides from Austin Hardware® are high-quality, heavy-duty slides representing two of the best drawer slide options available.

    Both are found extensively in emergency vehicles, utility bodies, cargo vans, maintenance trucks, recreational vehicles, and many other vehicular and non-vehicular applications. This is because their durability, flexibility, and ease of use are second to none.

    Both series’ have a load rating of up to 500 lbs. per pair, making them suitable to store all types of valuable cargo. The slides are tested at the 18” length but have been shown to perform to this rating up to 28”.

    The AH 7600 is the original, non-locking version of this slide. It is sold in pairs for applications where a lock is not required or desired.

    Read More

    Topics: Blog, drawer slides

    Learn the Three Screw Types Most Often Seen in the Transportation and Metal Fabrication Industries.

    Posted by Rob Dell'Elmo on Oct 11, 2021 9:30:00 AM

    The number of different types of screws available today is dizzying. There are many types for virtually any application.  

    We’re not going to try to explain every different type here. We’re only going to look at the three we see used most often in the transportation and metal fabrication industries. 

    They include: 

    • - Type F Thread Cutting and Thread Forming Screws 
    • - Tek Screws 
    • - Self-Tapping Screws 
    •  

    Thread cutting screws alone are available in numerous styles. A thread cutting screw is defined by its sharp edges at the tip and a cutout line to clear cut material. The difference between the types may include the number of cutting edges, the shape of the clearing cutout, the spacing of the threads, among other physical properties that make each uniquely suited for specific applications. 

    Read More

    Your Complete Guide to Fastener Nuts, A New Austin Hardware® Two-Part Blog Series, Pt.2.

    Posted by Rob Dell'Elmo on Sep 13, 2021 10:00:00 AM

    In a previous post, we discussed many of the different types of standard fastening nuts. In this edition, we’ll talk about locknuts. The major difference between standard nuts and locknuts is standard nuts consist simply of a threaded hole, while locknuts are designed to prevent loosening when exposed to vibration. As with standard nuts, there are many different variations of locknuts from which to choose. We’ll take a look at some of the more popular locknuts here. 

    Read More

    Topics: Products (General), fasteners, Blog

    Your Complete Guide to Fastener Nuts, A New Austin Hardware® Two-Part Blog Series.

    Posted by Rob Dell'Elmo on Aug 16, 2021 10:41:00 AM

    Fastener Series – Blog Post 19A (Fastening Nuts)

    Read More

    Topics: Vendor Managed Inventory, fasteners, Blog

    Austin Hardware Fastener Blog Series: Blind Bolts Explained.

    Posted by Rob Dell'Elmo on Jun 14, 2021 10:30:00 AM

    The speed and ease of installation of blind fasteners make them an excellent choice for manufacturers of all types of products. This is especially true when access to an application's backside is limited at best or completely inaccessible.

    Once determined that a blind fastener is right for the application, the user then must decide which type of blind fastener is most appropriate. While many factors could play into this decision, strength requirements and vibration resistance are two criteria that sit at the forefront.

    For lighter duty applications that are not load-bearing (under 100 lbs. of shear and tensile strength), a standard blind rivet is often adequate. For more information on standard blind rivets, check out our four-part series on blind rivets.

    Read More

    Topics: fasteners

    The Austin Hardware® Guide to Blind Rivets, Part Four

    Posted by Rob Dell'Elmo on May 18, 2021 10:00:00 AM

    This is Part 4 of a 4-part series on Blind Rivets

    In the first three parts of our series on blind rivets, we discussed the history of blind rivets; the most important factors to maximize joint integrity (grip range, hole size, material, and installation tooling); rivet selection (material, diameter, grip range, head style), and the most common types of blind rivets (drive-pin and break-stem; open-end, closed-end, self-plugging). To review any of those posts, please click on any of these links.

    In this final installation, we’ll break down some other variations of blind rivets. There are many different styles of blind rivets for specific applications, including different types of structural blind rivets.

    Structural blind rivets are required for applications requiring higher load and vibration tolerances. They have higher shear and pull-out strength than standard blind rivets. Many offer a wide grip range, while most have exceptional clamping force. While they’re not quite a replacement for a blind bolt, such as the Huck BOM, or heavy hex bolt, they are a great option when a standard blind rivet just won’t suffice.

    Read More

    Topics: Products (General), fasteners

    The Austin Hardware® Guide to Blind Rivets, Part Three

    Posted by Rob Dell'Elmo on Apr 19, 2021 10:45:00 AM

    This is Part 3 of a 4-part series on Blind Rivets

    In part one of our series on blind rivets, we briefly looked at their history and discussed the two most important considerations to maximize joint integrity: Grip Range and Hole Size. In part two, we broke down the importance of material and tooling as they pertain to joint integrity, as well as the specifics of blind rivet selection. If you have not yet read either of those posts, click HERE for part one and HERE for part two.

    In this post, we'll talk about the most common rivet types and their functional differences.

    There are two common blind rivet types: Drive-Pin and Break-Stem.

    Drive-pin blind rivets have a partial hole in the body and a mating pin that protrudes, positioned in the hole. The installer hammers the pin into the rivet body so that it's flush with the top of the rivet head. One of the significant benefits of a drive-pin rivet is that no special tools are required for installation. You can literally use a hammer if you wish. Drive-pin rivets can also be used with almost any material and don't require a hole to be drilled all the way through to insert. A drive-pin rivet's disadvantage relative to other types of blind rivets is that a backing block may be needed for installation depending on the material and application, which mitigates the benefit of blind installation. They also offer less clamping force than most other rivet styles.

    Read More